Linguistic Wordplay


It is, without a doubt, time for a wordplay post!

Linguistics is a spectacular science.  Among the array of specific measures and tasks that form part of its use; the significance and roots of words offers us a way to measure change in the use and structure of language.  Understanding how language changes over time helps us understand ourselves better; for example, it was once thought that all language was dynamic and therefore changed continuously.  We now know that this is the case linguistically, however not all language is dynamic.  Some language is simply what it is and never changes.  This type of static language makes it much easier to identify.

For example, let’s look at the following two paragraphs.  On the surface, they appear to have a complex structure, use complicated multi-syllabic words to give additional emphasis, and have a tempo that is passionate.  The rhythm and meter of the word groupings have a grandiose quality, similar to the rhythm and meter of political speeches or the oratory of someone with power and authority.  It is so ornate that, when spoken, they evoke a powerful emotional response; a quality of importance to politicians, in fact if one observes these paragraphs from that simple perspective, the paragraphs sound like a political speech and upon closer examination; one discovers that they sound like every political speech.   Could these paragraphs be an example and different and undefined linguistic tool with a design for political purposes?

They are not.  There is no such thing.  Linguistics is how we can observe and measure the significance of words.  These words don’t actually mean anything, they simply sound important and their sound not only disguises the fact that all of these complicated, fancy and carefully arranged words don’t say anything at all and therefore don’t mean anything.  They are static and unchanging, just like every political speech ever given.  They are designed to inspire people towards a goal, like a vote.  Read on and see for yourselves:

“It is important to remember that the continuous development of different types of activities demand exact precision and the complete support of the development model.  Superior ideological principles are what allow that an indiscriminate application of conclusive factors facilitates the creation of actual wide-spectrum casuistry.

It is obvious to point out that the constant increase in the quality and quantity of our activities complies with important obligations in the determination of new propositions.”

In the end, rather than being a new and undiscovered linguistic technique, the words are a perfect example of language that never changes; because it never does; it is, and always will be; BULLSHIT.

(Who said that scientists couldn’t be funny?  Laugh a little.  It lightens the burden of dealing with what’s left of the world.)

ctwfrank

 

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