Category Archives: HUMOR

June 25

Tomorrow; June 25; is the International Day of the Seafarer, according to the UN, so I would like to wish Popeye a wonderful day, I guess.

ctwfrank

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A Wordplay Buzz

Today; April 23, is International Irony Day. Seriously now, it is; don’t laugh.  Interestingly enough, we also happen to live on a planet where what pretty much everyone believes that the definition of Irony – or what they think irony is, is in fact, sarcasm.  The definition and examples of what most people would immediately call irony, is actually sarcasm – and we still decided to make April 23rd “International Irony Day”.  How messed up is that?

Do you know what’s even more messed up? The “irony” that’s being celebrated today is actually sarcasm, so today should be International Sarcasm Day, but nobody knows the difference anymore.  This is so IRONIC that it’s textbook irony, but it also mathematically validates the premise for International Irony day; so in the end, International Irony Day is ironic & as such, legitimate, but nobody knows because they think irony is sarcasm, which makes International Irony Day even more ironic.

Damn!  How does that shit happen?

I need to sit down for a minute….

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THOUGHT OF THE DAY

Sometimes I think you have to march right in and demand your rights, even if you don’t know what your rights are, or who the person is you’re talking to. Then, on the way out, slam the door. – Jack Handey

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Wordplay 2016: The irony of irony

A pristine example of the continued dismantling of significance and meaning in the use of the English language is found in the word IRONY.  Most people don’t know what it actually means and almost everyone thinks it means something else.  Further, the word is used in the common lexicon as if what everyone thinks it means is real and correct and by virtue of being accepted as such, its warped meaning becomes true by consensus.

An example of this phenomenon can be seen in popular music, specifically one song, titled Ironic.  This is not a criticism of the song or its spectacular author and singer; in fact the song is a personal favorite.  This is an observation of a linguistic affectation manifested by the civilization dynamic, not a judgment.  The lyrics of the song give examples of ironies such as, “rain on your wedding day” and “winning the lottery, then dying the very next day”.  These are excellent lyrics as far as communicating the sentiment that the song is imbued with; one that aligns perfectly with what almost everyone thinks is irony, but it’s not.   The ironies cited in the lyrics are actually examples of bad luck or negative causality, but not irony.  So then, what does irony actually mean?  Let’s look at the dictionary:

i·ro·ny
ˈīrənē/
noun: irony+9

  1. the expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.
  2. a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.
  3. a literary technique, originally used in Greek tragedy, by which the full significance of a character’s words or actions are clear to the audience or reader although unknown to the character.

 

The third definition is the one that gave birth to the word linguistically; its morphemic roots are tied to dramatic theater and form part of the literary forms that includes satire.

 

In conclusion, it turns out that irony is ironic; literally.

 

ctwfrank

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From the book of Murphy’s Laws:

Jenning’s Corollary to the Law of Selective Gravity

“The chance of the bread falling with the buttered side down is directly proportional to the cost of the carpet.”

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