Tag Archives: society

Rule # 11 – The mediocrity rule

In life, as with all things; a person must KNOW what they want and not settle for anything less.

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HOPE

I don’t want to lose hope. . . so I won’t.    

CTWFRANK

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Wordplay 2016: The irony of irony

A pristine example of the continued dismantling of significance and meaning in the use of the English language is found in the word IRONY.  Most people don’t know what it actually means and almost everyone thinks it means something else.  Further, the word is used in the common lexicon as if what everyone thinks it means is real and correct and by virtue of being accepted as such, its warped meaning becomes true by consensus.

An example of this phenomenon can be seen in popular music, specifically one song, titled Ironic.  This is not a criticism of the song or its spectacular author and singer; in fact the song is a personal favorite.  This is an observation of a linguistic affectation manifested by the civilization dynamic, not a judgment.  The lyrics of the song give examples of ironies such as, “rain on your wedding day” and “winning the lottery, then dying the very next day”.  These are excellent lyrics as far as communicating the sentiment that the song is imbued with; one that aligns perfectly with what almost everyone thinks is irony, but it’s not.   The ironies cited in the lyrics are actually examples of bad luck or negative causality, but not irony.  So then, what does irony actually mean?  Let’s look at the dictionary:

i·ro·ny
ˈīrənē/
noun: irony+9

  1. the expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.
  2. a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.
  3. a literary technique, originally used in Greek tragedy, by which the full significance of a character’s words or actions are clear to the audience or reader although unknown to the character.

 

The third definition is the one that gave birth to the word linguistically; its morphemic roots are tied to dramatic theater and form part of the literary forms that includes satire.

 

In conclusion, it turns out that irony is ironic; literally.

 

ctwfrank

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From the book of Murphy’s Laws:

Jenning’s Corollary to the Law of Selective Gravity

“The chance of the bread falling with the buttered side down is directly proportional to the cost of the carpet.”

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Women?

I’ve never had a problem communicating with people in general and with women in particular, especially my wife.    Today, however, I’m stumped.

I accompanied my wife to the doctor to get the results of an ultrasound she had done recently.  The doctor explained that the test shows a gallstone and she needed surgery to remove it.   After 2 or 3 minutes of pondering, she turns to ME and says:  “Fine, but I want new boobs.”

I just wrote this, and I still draw a blank.

Oh, one more thing.  Somehow during all of this, I somehow agreed to the new boobs.

 

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I’m Back!

To my wonderful family of subscribers, friends, followers and fans. I extend the most heartfelt invitation possible to all of you to participate in the next chapter of the math at https://ctwfranknew.wordpress.com/. Don’t forget to subscribe! I’ll see you there!

ctwfrank

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CONVERSATIONS WITH MY FATHER – MAD MONEY

There were a significant number of conversations with my father that most people would agree usually occurs between father and son when the son reaches 20 or so.  They are the first man-to-man conversations where sire and offspring bond and where the proud papa gets to transfer his “wisdom” to his son(s), you know – man stuff.

I began these conversations, and the relationship that accompanies them much later; in my late 30’s.  It gave me and interesting perspective on parenting and living with other people on a planet and being a man.  This one, by far, is my favorite of all time.

I was maybe 40 or 41 years old and my Dad was visiting my house. Suddenly he says to me:  “Let me see your wallet, son.  Please.”  I don’t think anyone is ever prepared for that question.  I asked him why he wanted to see my wallet, to which he replied:  “If I don’t see your wallet, I won’t be able to share a particular thought with you that might be useful.”  So I handed him my wallet.  He looked into all of the slots and pockets or whatever they are called until he was satisfied and then gave me my wallet back without saying anything at all.   He then took out his wallet; a brown bi-fold leather wallet; simple, classic and practical.  He opened it wide to expose the two pockets that one accessed basically from the inside middle of the wallet.  A common place for business cards and such that one considers “wallet-worthy” but don’t require quick access.  He opened up one of those pockets and began to pull out a folded piece of paper, or at least that’s what I thought I was seeing.  Suddenly the gesture became familiar:  I’d seen him do this before; the folded piece of paper was money, usually a $100.00 bill.   He pulled out the bill and unfolded it, indeed it was a nice crisp $100.00 bill. Then he looked at me and his eyes became those of a mischievous little boy and he smiled his irresistible smile – whatever was coming next was going to be, if anything, fun.

Even though we were alone, he looked to his left and then to his right and lowering his voice a bit, said to me:

“Now listen up Son, and listen well.  This is what’s called “mad money” you should always keep a C-note in your wallet for mad money.  It’s important.  Do not forget this, okay?

I simply had to ask, so I did, I said:  “What for, pop?”  He grinned and let out a slightly sinister giggle as he looked at me and put a hand on my shoulder right before answering my question.  He winked at me and said:  “Because;… you never know!” and skipped out of the room, giggling all the way out the front door.”

As usual, pop was right.  I carried my “mad-money”, as my father taught me until we destroyed the function and concept of money, but during the years that I did, on more than one occasion, it saved my ass, got me out of a mess or was that which allowed me to ask the gorgeous blonde sitting on a buddy’s couch looking bored after everyone else lost their pocket money playing poker if she wanted to have dinner, or drinks.  Dad always said: “Never use mad money for anything that you should cover out of your pocket.  It will let you know when to pull it out of your wallet.  It most certainly did.

Mad money.  I would have never, ever calculated the enormous importance of that concept in my life if my father had not passed it down.  It may be one of the most useful tools I’ve ever had, because:  you never know!

That’s my pop

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